Study: Kids’ ER visits fell after withdrawal of cold meds


Associated Press

CHICAGO

Removing cough and cold medicines for very young children from store shelves led to a big decline in emergency-room visits for bad reactions to the drugs, government research found.

But the results released online today are a mixed bag: Some parents still were giving their infants and toddlers these medicines, and many ER cases still involved youngsters who apparently got hold of the medications themselves.

That suggests parents who stopped using them hadn’t discarded old bottles or kept them out of reach after manufacturers voluntarily withdrew medicines labeled for infants and children up to age 2 in 2007.

The bottom-line message: “Keep all medicines up and away and out of sight,” said Dr. Daniel Budnitz, the study’s senior author and a researcher at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Budnitz said the results also indicate the need for better childproof containers.

The study appears in the journal Pediatrics.

Makers of over-the- counter cough and cold medicines voluntarily withdrew the products, mostly syrups, in October 2007. Pediatricians had complained that the products don’t work in young kids and posed a safety risk because of accidental overdoses causing extreme drowsiness, increased heart rate and even some deaths.

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