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Mahoning County winery can continue operating pending appeal to Ohio Supreme Court



Published: Thu, June 10, 2010 @ 10:00 a.m.

COLUMBUS — The Ohio Supreme Court has granted a stay of a 7th District Court of Appeals decision that a Lake Milton winery must cease operating in a lakefront residential neighborhood.

The stay, granted Wednesday, will let the Myrddin Winery, at 3020 Scenic Drive in Milton Township, continue to operate while the winery’s appeal is pending before the top court.

Winery operator Gayle K. Sperry requested the stay, saying her family would “suffer severe economic losses if forced to close” while the appeal is pending.

For the complete story, see Friday's Vindicator and Vindy.com


Comments

1Bigben(1996 comments)posted 4 years, 6 months ago

It is a wine store not a winery I think that is the point.If it was a real agricultural operation it would be less of a problem.Plenty of other places for a wine store.There ought to be some places around here that sprawl can't touch or at least be abated somewhat.

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2Bigben(1996 comments)posted 4 years, 6 months ago

I understand that they make the wine there but they don't grow the grapes there as far as I know .Therefore it is not really agriculture.

As for sprawl it all starts somewhere and often one building leads to a whole lot more.Sort of like when someone wants to live in the country ,then another and before you know it isn't the country any more it is just another developement with bigger yards.

Stick a pizza shop or supermarket in the country some place that was formerly queit and peaceful and due to the volume of traffic a place gets , sprawl soon follows.Pop a Walmart into a former cornfield or wooded area and the neighborhood changes dramatically and if the neighbors don't have the funds to influence politicians to prevent it from being built their whole life can be turned upside down.That is why what is left of our farmers will sometimes erect signs around Mahoning County stating this is a farming area if you don't like what goes with the territory then maybe it isn't the place for you.

So I can understand someone who moved out there for peace and quiet that dosen't want all that goes with a thriving business in an otherwise peaceful place.

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3Bigben(1996 comments)posted 4 years, 6 months ago

I
As for sprawl it all starts somewhere and often one building starts the domino effect.
Stick a pizza shop or supermarket in the country some place that was formerly queit and peaceful and due to the volume of traffic a place gets , sprawl soon follows.Pop a Walmart into a former cornfield or wooded area and the neighborhood changes dramatically and if the neighbors don't have the funds to influence politicians to prevent it from being built their whole life can be turned upside down.
That is why the handful of farmers left will erect signs around Mahoning County stating this is a farming area if you don't like what goes with it then this place isn't for you.

Obviously from the article you provide the courts will decide meaning the judge.I don't know but what might have happened is they may have started growing their own vines -the 5% that goes into thier wine may have been enough but as the need for more grapes to meet increased demand occurred they continued to make the wine but bought the lion's share of grapes else where .So what started out as an agriculturual /business venture changed into more of a business and novelty agriculture.Perhaps that is one reason for the zoning situation.In other words the zoning may not have changed but the what was zoned had changed.It would be really neat I think if they could grow all the grapes needed out there or a high percentage of them then it would be truly agricultural .

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4Bigben(1996 comments)posted 4 years, 6 months ago

Sorry about the double post I wanted to do some editing and that is why I posted the second.The second addresses more of the heart of the link you have provided.

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5grayarea(5 comments)posted 4 years, 6 months ago

Its not a country road, its a gravel dead end street, maybe 600 ft long, about two football fields, and there are six houses on the street. the house the winery is in was the last house built on the street. Current occupants have lived there since the 70's , the house the winery is in was built in 1997. The winery moved in about 2005.
In the past people from the city would move in next to a farm and complain about the smell and noise, this situation is the opposite, the quiet, yes small, neighborhood was there since the 50's and in 2005 the winery moved into the house. The lot the winery is on , is a whopping 200ft by 200ft. Its not like a 100 acres or even 10 or even 1. And they are trying to call it a farm. If it was truly on one of the nearby country roads, noone would care. Mastropietro Winery is on a country road about three miles away and I don't think anyone complains about it.

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6Bigben(1996 comments)posted 4 years, 6 months ago

Grayarea I was using the urban sprawl example as folks who had unrealistic expectations of neighbors who had been on the land for generations as farmers.In other words I have arrived now you change for me.

The same could be said of the folks who have the winery.It was a quiet small area on a dead end road for decades .Now the owners of the Winery as of 2005 started a business and have grown their business beyond what the other neighbors had wanted or possibly expected.

From what you have said the winery doesn't have much property and I'm wondering if they have the potential to purchase more land expand in any direction nearby to cultivate more grapes.It is an unfortunate scenario for the neighbors wanting peace and the winery wanting business.Two good goals that are at odds with each other- not an easy thing to decide.I hope it works out for the best.

Thankyou for sharing the information with us it was informative.

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7adockinthebay(4 comments)posted 4 years, 6 months ago

This winery is a small quiet place to sit and enjoy the peace and quiet of the area. There is a book shlef for something to read and several board games to play with friends. Unless you have been there and have talked to Gayle you would know that this is never going to turn into urban sprawl. She has planted many gardens and feeds a wide range of birds.
Only speak from knowledge not from rumors.

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8Bigben(1996 comments)posted 4 years, 6 months ago


Adockinthebay-I hope you are right as there is way too much sprawl around.

When a business expands though there is often need of more parking space.I was curios as to wheteher any expansion was possible in order to grow more grapes on site or nearby so that it could meet the agriculture zoning standard.

I know I wasn't speaking from rumor.I was making the point that the issue is whether or not the winery is in fact an agricultural business or a business.That was the issue the Vindy raised and one in which the courts will decide.

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