facebooktwitterRSS
- Advertisement -
  • Most Commentedmost commented up
  • Most Emailedmost emailed up
  • Popularmost popular up
- Advertisement -
 

« News Home

Girard goes high-tech with new junior/senior high school



Published: Fri, August 20, 2010 @ 12:01 a.m.

photo

William Ryser, senior high principal at the new Girard Junior/Senior High School, pitches in to clean the fl oor after an inadvertent spill as a statue of an Indian, the Girard mascot, “oversees.” Ryser said he thinks the new building will inspire students and the sleek surroundings will enhance learning.

photo

A distinctive architectural shape highlights the front of the new junior/senior high school, 1244 Shannon Road.

By LINDA M. LINONIS

linonis@vindy.com

GIRARD

Joseph Jeswald, Girard schools superintendent, described the new $26 million junior/senior high school as a “21st-century learning center.”

It will equip students with the necessary skills to compete in the evolving high-tech world and “give them the opportunity for success in the global economy,” he said.

Students will have access to state-of-the-art technology including four computer labs and some 260 new computers. Each teacher has a computer.

Jeswald said the science, technology, engineering and mathematics program especially taps into computer technology, and 12th-graders will do senior projects using computers.

“Critical thinking, creativity, innovative, research, communication skills and teamwork will all benefit,” Jeswald said.

William Ryser, high school principal, said the “space to learn” in itself will inspire students.

“I think they will be holding their heads up high,” he said. Sleek surroundings will enhance learning, he added.

In regular classrooms, there are some 30 SMART Boards connected to teachers’ computers. Ted Ragan, computer-technology specialist, said the interactive-teaching devices are a benefit to teaching in that they save and display presentations created by teachers and link to the Internet. “It’s a nice teaching tool,” he said.

He also noted classroom media centers include DVDs, VCRs and SMART Boards that can “stream live from the Internet.”

“It’s like having a theater in each room,” Ragan said, noting this educational technology engages students.

When school starts Sept. 7, students and teachers will walk spacious halls and sit in roomy classrooms. The air-conditioned school has two wings, one for the high school students numbering about 520 in ninth through 12th grades and, and the other for junior high, about 250 students in seventh and eighth grades.

On the first floor is the home of administrative offices. “This is a better setup,” Jeswald said. In the old building, offices for Ryser and Louise Mason, junior high principal, were in different areas. Access to the school interior will be controlled here.

On the second floor is the media center (library), where books on shelves share space with computers.

In the classroom area, a biology and anatomy lab share a storage space with the chemistry and physics lab.

The production lab for construction-tech prep, robotics and other hands-on applications is well-equipped with such tools as a table saw, lathe and drill press.

As part of the energy-efficient design, lights turn on automatically when someone enters and turn off when the room is unoccupied.

There are a number of aesthetic touches such as the use of red and black, school colors, throughout the building. The senior high has black lockers, and the junior high’s are red.

Other features include a 300-seat student dining room that can double as an auditorium, specially equipped classrooms for special-needs students, wrestling room and high school gym with seating for 1,300 and junior high gym with seating for about 400. The past is preserved in display cases with trophies, plaques and awards.

A committee of community residents contributed ideas for the school to the administration, who worked with architects on the design.


GIRARD JUNIOR/SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

An open house is scheduled at the new Girard Junior/Senior High School, 1244 Shannon Road, from 1 to 4 p.m. Sept. 4. Joseph Jeswald, Girard superintendent, said they hope to preserve the concrete sign at the top of the old building that says “Girard” and use it at the new school.

Cost: Cost of the new school is $26 million. The Ohio School Facilities Commission is paying for 80 percent of the cost, and a local loan covers the remainder. The old high school was built in 1924.

Space: 130,000 square feet in the two-story building on 25 acres.

Classrooms: 47. Regular classrooms are 810 square feet; labs, 1,100 square feet.

Computers: There are four computer labs and about 260 new computers.

Special features: Thirty SMART Boards, interactive-teaching devices connected to a computer; cafeteria that doubles as an auditorium with stage and seating for 300; two gyms, one for junior high and another for senior high; 330 parking spaces; and security cameras inside and out.

Source: Superintendent’s office


Comments

1Nonsocialist(710 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Aristocracy Update for 20 August 2010:

Consider it an economic stimulus program...for Martha's Vineyard....and Spain...

The Rulers are taking their fifth hard earned vacation...since July (it's August..1 month later). In their selfless effort to "stimulate" the tourist industry, Queen Michelle spent $375,000.00 of US taxpayer money in Spain, and now the rulers have rented accomodations costing up to $50,000.00/week in Martha's Vineyard.

Can both be broke as a country and fund the extravagant lifestyle of our rulers? Yes We Can!! Yes We Can!!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/world...

http://politics.usnews.com/news/blogs...

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/obamas...

http://www.capecodonline.com/apps/pbc...

Suggest removal:

2UnionForever(1470 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

All these Taj Mahal type High Schools were the wrong thing to do in this economy. How are the districts gonna maintain them - more property taxes on those of us who can't afford the property taxes we currently have? Governor Stricknine has not solved the school funding problem - only kicked the can down the road to the property taxpayers to pay more.

Time has come to change the overgenrous pay, healthcare, and pension benefits for all school employees to better match the realities of the private sector these days or else the state of Ohio will go bankrupt. How is that $8 billion budget problem gonna get fixed if we continue down this Tax & Spend pathwithout a course correction?

Suggest removal:

3Stan(9923 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

We need a couple of these schools built in Youngstown . State of the art security could be built in to eliminate firearms, drugs and knives in school . Then let the learning begin !

Suggest removal:

4WarrenRicheyKid(167 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Girard City schools have a good record in both academics and sports programs. The new high school is an investment in the future that will payoff not only for Girard but also for the area.

Suggest removal:

5Heartland(38 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

I remember when Nancy Reagan spent $1 million in tax dollars for new china. Meanwhile, Ronnie declared ketchup was a vegetable for school children. We still have some of the same misguided greedheads who don't want to spend a dime on our kids education. Meanwhile they think it's ok to give WalMart $1 billion in corporate welfare.

Suggest removal:

6JeffLebowski(953 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

According to the OFSC website the project was funded in 2000 -- money wasn't quite so tight then. Nonetheless, this was a wise investment in a city where such things are few and far between.

Suggest removal:

7city_resident(513 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

"Based on the $26 million dollar price tag and 130k sq. ft. this school is $200 a square foot build price. Unsure where the technology pieces are being funded from. Unsure where the outside grounds design are being subsidized from."

Just FYI, in an OSFC funded project, the $26 million price includes the technology, and the landscape/site.

Suggest removal:

8theguins(169 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

The 26 million included all the equipment and furnishings to the new facility. 78% of the costs are covered by the State through the Ohio Schools Facility Commission.
The community and above all the students deserve it

Suggest removal:

9JeffLebowski(953 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Check the OFSC for answers to some of your questions. The state system could well be broken but the school district is to be commended for getting the funding -- if Columbus is handing out money and yours is a competitive district with a dilapidated existing building, why not?

Suggest removal:

10Stan(9923 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Education is the foundation of industry . We have the labor pool but we need a new generation with the mentality to achieve greatness for our area . This time around let us not export the technology but let us export the manufactured products !

Suggest removal:

11theguins(169 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

A good portion of the moneys came through the state by way of the government settlement with the tobacco industry.

Suggest removal:

12Freeatlast(1991 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Sure wish I could go back to school there . sounds SUPER . GOOD JOB

Suggest removal:

13walter_sobchak(1910 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Absolutely coorect. Most of this money was from the tobacco industry settlement. It was distributed on a pro-rated basis based on the composition of the districts. I believe Yongstown City Schools got 83% of the money from the OSFC. Unfortunately, when you take the OSFC money, you must conform to their guidelines. But, it is ludicrous to believe the maintenance of this new facility will be more than the old facility. The old Girard HS was very inefficient and likely not very healthy. In addition, the technology tools that are installed are pricey but necessary. The installation of so many SMART boards was wise. It is a great learning tool for motivated students. Some of you posters have some real backward thinking. Do you really believe our kids are going to compete with the rest of the world working in "Tab A into Slot B" jobs? It's not going to happen. Get your heads out of your arses and move forward already.

Suggest removal:

14cambridge(3013 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

It's hilarious that the same people that are against building schools that are geared for the future think that the Moaning Valley is the place the high tech industry should relocate.

I have to laugh to keep from crying.

Suggest removal:

15hurrdurr(98 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

DVDs!! VCRs!! CRT monitors!!

What is this? A celebration of 1990s technology?

I'm glad Girard has a new building, but the picture in the print edition of the technology coordinator standing with a classroom full of old CRT monitors and probably refurbished Dells makes me want to puke.

It's just an incredible waste of space and energy in a brand new setting.

I have no idea what a SMART board is, but it seems to me to just be a fancy name for a projector. One you can plug into a laptop! Oh wow! Welcome to the future!!

Suggest removal:

16glbtactivist(250 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Another waste of taxpayer dollars. The prior high school could have been repaired and the history maintained. Instead the Board decided to spend millions of taxpayer dollars needlessly. Shame on them.

Suggest removal:

17walter_sobchak(1910 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

hurrdurr,

DVDs!! VCRs!! CRT monitors!

Did you ever think that these items were relocated from the old school to the new school? Just because something newer and more powerful doesn't mean that the old equipment is useless! Maybe you should investigate what a SMART board is. My kids used them and thought they were great.

I remember touring my old high school before it was torn down, 30 years after attending it. All I could think of was "How could I stand coming to this this place for 4 years? It was small, uncomfortable, and not an appealling place to be. We expect our kids to attend school for more days and for a longer day and don't want to make the physical plant amenable to the students and teachers. Be glad you don't live in PA where they truly build lavish buildings and the people are merely assessed more taxes.

Suggest removal:

18prodgodq(150 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Bitterness is an interesting emotion. If you let it, it will creep into everything you think and everything you do.
I see that a lot on the message boards here.
I would bet that 99.9% of the people doing the complaining on the board have taken 0% action to back up their beliefs and observations.
I believe that if this area is going to have a future at all, we're going to have to focus on education. Without it, we will not attract the kind of jobs that this area needs to survive. Whether we like it or not, we are now in a global labor market. We are competing with every other state and region in this country, and every other country in the world. For those of you who think it's impossible for us to compete and that all of this school building is a waste of time..........leave.
If you hate the area that you live in......leave. For those of you who are angry or uhappy with is area and are actually willing to do something about it, no matter what your politics or what you want to see changed, please stay here, we need you.
For those of you whose only idea of taking "action" is to post on a message board.......bye. No one will miss you.

Suggest removal:

19hurrdurr(98 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Old equipment might not be useless, but it's getting there. Thing is, it wouldn't take much effort to transfer old VCR tapes onto DVDs or other more efficient mediums.

CRT monitors in a new building though is absurd. If you're starting from scratch and aiming for a more energy efficient school, why not try to get some refurbished LCD monitors?

Suggest removal:

20HaydenThomas(208 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

Whenever it's tax dollars funding anything, the project becomes Taj Mahal in nature. Whether it's schools, or compensation for those who feed off the public.

Suggest removal:

21Tigerlily(488 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

This is such a scumbag forum, Vindy. You should really clean up the ignorance left behind by your readers.

Suggest removal:

22Tigerlily(488 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

You're free to speak whatever you want. Scummy speech is scummy speech though.

And much of it actually IS popular, the scum.

Suggest removal:

23WarrenRicheyKid(167 comments)posted 4 years, 1 month ago

"Locals just love spending other folks money. This region would come to screeching halt without all the wealth redistribution."

Whether you have kids who'll attend the new high school or not, those Girard students belong to ALL of us. As such they deserve the best. When we're at the end of our days we will need the services of intelligent care providers. So let's invest in the Mahoning Valley's future, for my sake and yours.

Suggest removal:

24Heartland(38 comments)posted 4 years ago

I don't love spending tax money for WalMart when they make billions. Two-thirds of corporations pay no taxes. It's time conservatives hearts quit bleeding for these corporations. These same corporations have exported jobs and the U.S. taxpayer still give them corporate welfare. I'd rather give my tax dollars to schools.

Suggest removal:


News
Opinion
Entertainment
Sports
Marketplace
Classifieds
Records
Discussions
Community
Help
Forms
Neighbors

HomeTerms of UsePrivacy StatementAdvertiseStaff DirectoryHelp
© 2014 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.
107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503

Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565
Sponsored Links: Vindy Wheels | Vindy Jobs | Vindy Homes | Pittsburgh International Airport