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GM buyout offers fall short of goal; layoffs looming



Published: Tue, August 4, 2009 @ 12:00 a.m.

DETROIT (AP) — About 6,000 General Motors Co. blue-collar workers have taken the latest round of early-retirement and buyout offers, but it fell short of the company’s goal, meaning more layoffs are likely.

GM has about 54,000 factory workers and wants to end the year with 40,500, a cut of about 13,500. Monday’s report means that about 7,500 too few workers took the offers, setting the stage for more layoffs.

The automaker announced in June and July that it would close 15 U.S. factories employing about 22,000 workers by end of 2012.

Spokeswoman Sherrie Childers-Arb said Monday that the number of layoffs has yet to be determined because some workers at closed factories could take open jobs at other factories.

One of the closed factories in Michigan will be reopened to make a new subcompact car, while two others in Spring Hill, Tenn., and Janesville, Wis., will close and be on “standby” in case sales rise and GM needs to reopen them.

GM said in a statement that most of the workers officially left the company’s employment Saturday.

Sixty-five percent of the workers took early-retirement packages, while about 30 percent took buyouts, with the remainder taking incentives allowing them to retire before they are eligible, the company said.

About 40 percent of the 6,000 were skilled trades workers, with the remainder coming from the production work force.

Diana Tremblay, vice president of labor relations, said in the statement that the reductions are needed to position GM for long-term viability.

“Results of this special attrition program will help GM lower its employment cost and close the competitive gap” with Japanese automakers that have U.S. factories, she said.

She called the acceptance rate a success, given that it was the second round of offers this year. In March, about 7,000 workers took a previous round of early retirement or buyout offers.

By the end of the year, GM’s hourly work force will be less than one-tenth of what it was at its peak of 468,000 in 1979. About 66,000 U.S. hourly workers have left GM under buyouts or early retirements since 2006.

GM at present is not considering another round of offers, the company said.

More workers at plants slated to be closed took the offers than those at plants that are staying open, Childers-Arb said.

More than half the 721 workers at a parts stamping plant in Mansfield, Ohio, that is scheduled to close in June of 2010 took the offers, the highest rate in the company, she said.

More workers took buyouts this time than in previous offers, she said.

GM emerged from bankruptcy protection on July 10 and has received $50 billion in aid from the U.S. government.

The company has lost more than $80 billion in the past four years.

The automaker hopes that the plant closures will let it run its remaining factories at close to full capacity, which is far more cost-effective.

All U.S. hourly workers represented by the United Auto Workers were offered packages to leave the company.

Production workers were offered $20,000 plus a $25,000 car voucher for early retirement, while skilled trades workers were offered $45,000 plus the voucher.

Workers with 20 or more years of service were offered buyout packages of $115,000 and the car voucher.

Those with less than 10 years would get $45,000 and the car voucher to leave GM outright.

In the past, laid-off workers went into the “jobs bank” which allowed them to collect most of their pay indefinitely even if their plants had been closed.

But the UAW earlier this year gave up the benefit in concession talks with GM, Chrysler Group LLC and Ford Motor Co.

Now workers will get state unemployment benefits and supplemental pay that equals 72 percent of their gross pay for at least a year, depending on seniority. After that, they can get transitional pay amounting to half their gross pay. But if they turn down an offer to work at another plant, their pay and benefits go away.

GM alone controlled 54 percent of the U.S. auto market in 1954, but it has been forced to cut employment as its share dwindled through the years. It stood around 20 percent during the first half of this year.

See also:Good news for General Motors, Ford reports first sales increase in nearly 2 years, Buyers flood market looking for deals


Comments

1ufosd(16 comments)posted 4 years, 11 months ago

To my brothers and sisters at GM be careful what you do regarding your exit from GM. I believe that eventually as the numbers drop in your work population you will see the same results as in the Delphi reduction, The company will make promises to get you to leave and after many have done so it will be possible to pull the rug out from under you and leave you with little or no benefits, each person must decide what is best for them and their families. Be Careful, Trust no one especially Government Motors.

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2YSUgrad99(200 comments)posted 4 years, 11 months ago

I for one hope for a stronger GM. I've been a faithful Chevy owner for the past 15 years (1991 Chevy Cavalier Z24, 1995 Chevy Lumina, 2001 Chevy Impala, 2008 Chevy Impala). My 2001 Impala ran to 290,000 miles. If you take care of your car, it will take care of you. I do however believe GM has many quality issues to address with its cars, which I'm hopeful they'll take care of. Love my new Impala!

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