Manning to have right thumb examined



INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -- Colts quarterback Peyton Manning is scheduled to have X-rays on his injured right thumb, although Colts officials don't believe it will affect his status for the Super Bowl against Chicago on Feb. 4.
Manning hit the thumb on his throwing hand on the helmet of left tackle Tarik Glenn late in the Colts' 38-34 victory over New England in the AFC championship Sunday night.
Coach Tony Dungy said the thumb was discolored after the game and that Manning was hurting.
"But from everything I hear, it's going to be OK," Dungy said.
Manning ranks second on the NFL's consecutive starts list, behind Brett Favre. He has started 156 consecutive games, including playoffs, in his nine-year career.
In fact, Manning has only missed one play because of injury -- in a 2001 game against Miami.
Dolphins defensive end Lorenzo Bromell hit Manning with his helmet under the chin strap, fracturing Manning's jaw and drawing blood.
Backup Mark Rypien replaced Manning, botched the handoff on the ensuing play and the Dolphins returned the fumble for a touchdown. Bromell was later fined 15,500 for the helmet-to-helmet hit.
Manning's backup now is Jim Sorgi, a third-year player out of Wisconsin.
On Monday, Dungy was more concerned about cornerback Nick Harper's sprained left ankle than Manning's injury.
Harper left during the first half of the AFC championship game and didn't return.
Dungy said he was uncertain whether it was a high ankle sprain or a basketball-variety sprain he sustained by rolling the ankle.
If it's a high ankle sprain, it could take four to six weeks to recover.
Tight end Ben Utecht also sprained his right knee in the game, but returned.
Dungy sounded optimistic that Utecht would play against the Bears.
Copyright 2007 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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