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Today is Monday, Jan. 17, the 17th day of 2005. There are 348 days left in the year. This is Martin



Published: Mon, January 17, 2005 @ 12:00 a.m.



Today is Monday, Jan. 17, the 17th day of 2005. There are 348 days left in the year. This is Martin Luther King Day. On this date in 1955, the submarine USS Nautilus makes its first nuclear-powered test run from its berth in Groton, Conn.

In 1706, Benjamin Franklin is born in Boston. In 1893, the 19th president of the United States, Rutherford B. Hayes, dies in Fremont, Ohio, at age 70. In 1893, Hawaii's monarchy is overthrown as a group of businessmen and sugar planters force Queen Liliuokalani to abdicate. In 1945, Soviet and Polish forces liberate Warsaw during World War II. In 1945, Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, credited with saving tens of thousands of Jews, disappears in Hungary while in Soviet custody. In 1961, in his farewell address, President Eisenhower warns against the rise of "the military-industrial complex." In 1977, convicted murderer Gary Gilmore, 36, is shot by a firing squad at Utah State Prison in the first U.S. execution in a decade. In 1984, the U.S. Supreme Court rules, 5-4, that the private use of home video cassette recorders to tape television programs does not violate federal copyright laws. In 1991, in the first day of Operation Desert Storm, U.S.-led forces hammer Iraqi targets in an effort to drive Iraq out of Kuwait; a defiant Iraqi President Saddam Hussein declares that the "mother of all battles" has begun. In 1994, a 6.7 magnitude earthquake strikes Southern California, killing at least 61 people and causing $20 billion worth of damage.

January 17, 1980: For the past six months, a detective of the Youngstown Police Department has been investigating allegations of corruption, misuse of city property and other wrongdoing in the Waste Water Treatment Plant.

The president of Shell Oil Co. says gasoline prices in the United States could reach $2 per gallon before 1980 is over. Shell has said its net profit for 1979 will exceed $1 billion.

Representatives from the Jones & amp; Laughlin and Republic Steel companies, testifying in Columbus, say federal environmental and energy policies have cost the steel industry millions of dollars and hampered modernization of facilities.

January 17, 1965: Youngstown's new sewage treatment plant has begun operation, and under a three-pronged start-up is expected to be in full operation by early summer.

After trailing for most of the game, Youngstown University's Penguins battle to a 46-46 tie late in the game with Gannon College at Erie, but lose 48-47.

January 17, 1955: Mayor Frank X. Kryzan acknowledges that the city's lease with the U.S. Army Engineers for use of the Youngstown Municipal Airport does not permit renegotiation at any time, but says he will still send a letter to the Air Force and Defense Department asking for renegotiation in an effort to determine how much expansion the Air Force intends at Vienna.

The USS Nautilus, the world's first vessel to be propelled by atomic power, goes to sea for trials. The 2,800-ton submarine generates enough power to allow it to circumnavigate the world without surfacing.

Thieve set a fire in the rear of the Isaly Dairy Store in the McGuffey Plaza to divert attention, and escape with nearly $500 from an unlocked safe while store employees fought the blaze.

January 17, 1930: Money for a survey of the Mahoning, Shenango and Beaver river channels to determine the feasibility of a canal will be included by Chairman Dempsey of the House rivers and harbors committee in a $100 million omnibus bill.

Near flood conditions have driven the water rats to dig new homes higher up and Charles Allen, county superintendent of maintenance, reports that the rats are doing considerable damage to county bridges. The bridge at Washingtonville is reported near collapse.

Ohio Gov. Myers Y. Cooper says the average admittance fee to county fairs in Ohio was 27 cents, which he tells the Ohio Fair Managers Association is too low. The governor suggests that a 50-cent charge would not be too high.




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