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LONDON Records list Jagger's '69 London drug claim



Published: Sat, August 6, 2005 @ 12:00 a.m.



The National Archives have declassified the police files.

LONDON (AP) -- Today, he's referred to as Sir Mick Jagger. But 35 years ago, he was a rock rebel who could rattle the authorities.

In 1969, police considered Jagger an "intelligent young man" who lived on the fringe and consorted with "the dregs of society," according to newly released documents.

The police files, declassified by the National Archives, detail Jagger's claim that detectives planted drugs during a 1969 raid on his London apartment.

Jagger was fined about $500 for possession of cannabis after the raid on his Chelsea home.

The rocker claimed that a drug squad officer, Detective Sgt. Robin Constable, had tried to plant "white powder" inside a box in the house.

"I think he put the box down and opened the folded paper. He said, 'Ah, ah,' we won't have to look much further,"' Jagger said in a statement to police.

"As I got to him he showed me the paper and I saw it contained some white powder."

Jagger claimed Constable then said, "Don't worry, Mick, we can sort it all out."

"He twice asked me how much it was worth. He then said 'a thousand,' but I never replied," Jagger said.

Interviews done

Scotland Yard interviewed supporters of Jagger's, who included a lawyer, a member of Parliament and minor drug dealers.

"The private persons interviewed during the course of this investigation represent extreme ends of the scale. At one end are public figures whilst at the other are the dregs of society," noted Commander Robert Huntley, who oversaw the inquiry.

The investigation concluded there was no "substantial corroborative evidence" for Jagger's claim against Constable.

"Michael Jagger is an intelligent young man, and doubtless is on the fringe, if not embroiled in the world of users of dangerous drugs," said Detective Chief Inspector William Wilson, one of the investigators.

The case was referred to the Director of Public Prosecutions, who concluded that no action should be taken against the police.




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