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Stan Hywet has new audio tour



Published: Sun, May 27, 2001 @ 12:00 a.m.



Stan Hywet hasnew audio tour

Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, the Akron historic estate featuring a 65-room Tudor Revival mansion and 70 acres of gardens and grounds, has developed an audio tour that explores and explains its historic gardens. The audio tour includes more than 20 individual stops for guests to access information about specific gardens, outdoor sport activities and other events that have taken place on the property.

The tour relies on the technology of programmed handheld listening wands with simple keypads. The tour route is flexible and is guided by code numbers on signs and visitor's map.

Audio rental fees are $3 for Stan Hywet members and $4 for non-members. Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens is located at 714 North Portage Path in Akron. For more information call 33-836-5533 or visit the Web site at www.stanhywet.org.

House tour set

The Hudson Garden Club annual house and garden tour will be held Wednesday through Friday, June 13-15. Wednesday tours are held from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Thursday and Friday tours will be held from 10 a.m to 5 p.m.

Visitors can stroll through historic homes and gardens as well as purchase garden supplies at the Hudson Middle School.

Sponsored by the Hudson Garden Club proceeds from the ticket sales will benefit educational programs, community gardens, workshops, field trips and materials in public schools and libraries.

Tickets cost $15 and are available at the Hudson Middle School and the booth on the Green by the Clock Tower at Main and Aurora Streets.

For more information call 330-650-1671 or visit the Web site at www.hudsongc@aol.com.

Traveling exhibitto open June 9

The traveling exhibit & quot;Madagascar: Biodiversity and Conservation & quot; will open at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History on June 9 and run through July 22.

The exhibit, which is free with museum admission, is designed to illuminate the principles of ecology and evolutionary biology and educate people about the forms, implications and threat to biodiversity, according to museum spokesman Dan Lagiovane.

The museum, located at 4400 Forbes Avenue in Pittsburgh, is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. The museum will be open on Mondays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. beginning July 9. Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for senior citizens, $4 for children ages 3-18 and full time students with an ID. For more information call 412-622-3131 or visit the museum Web site at www.carnegiemuseums.org/ cmnh.

'Green' snowmobilesput into useat Yellowstone

Who can think snow these days? Try the people at Yellowstone National Park Lodges, who have leased a fleet of 45 cleaner, "greener" snowmobiles to rent out the next two winter seasons. They're destined for a short sweet life in the park, however, since snowmobiles are banned after that.

Snowmobilers next winter can try out the Arctic Cat four-stroke engine machines that use electronic fuel injection and are said to be 65 percent more fuel-efficient than the two-stroke engine. "They burn cleaner and run quieter and are a more pleasurable experience," said Jim McCaleb, general manager of the lodges for the concessioner, Amfac Parks and Resorts. The Cats will be available at the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel and Old Faithful Snow Lodge, which stay open all winter.

Following two executive orders and the Clean Air Act, the park service is mandated to phase out snowmobiles, which adversely affect wildlife and create noise, pollution and safety hazards, said Yellowstone park spokeswoman Cheryl Matthews. For the winter of 2002, snowmobile use will be limited to guided tours, she said. After that, only snowcoaches will be allowed.

McCaleb said the lodges have 30 snow coaches with experienced drivers. "We don't expect any drop in visitation," he said.

Picasso art uncensored

Sophisticated art lovers will get a rare chance to see 350 works by Pablo Picasso dealing with themes of eroticism and sexuality. The "Picasso Erotique" exhibit opens June 14 in the Montreal Museum of Fine Art. Garnered from 40 public and private collections, the exhibit includes works rarely, if ever, exhibited publicly because of censorship. Paintings, drawings and sculptures span the artist's long career from the bordello scenes of his youth in Barcelona to the nudes he painted at age 90. It's a "long overdue contribution to our understanding of the 20th century's greatest artist," said museum director Guy Cogeval.

"Art is not chaste. If it is, it's not art," Picasso once noted. Far from being chastised by an unappreciative mayor, the exhibit has the support of Montreal municipal officials and Canadian media partners. It will be on view through Sept. 16.

Take the trainto the track

Amtrak's Monster Mile Express departs June 3 for the Winston Cup Series at Dover Downs Speedway in Delaware.

NASCAR race fans can board the special train at New York's Penn Station or at Newark, Trenton, Philadelphia or Wilmington. Amtrak, which doesn't normally operate trains to Dover, will run a special route over rented freight tracks to deliver fans to the races, according to Northeast Corridor spokeswoman Cecilia Cummings.

You can leave the driving to Amtrak and enjoy a "party on wheels," avoiding highway gridlock, Cummings said.

D-Day honoredin Virginia

A National D-Day Memorial will be dedicated in central Virginia June 6, on the 57th anniversary of the World War II Allied landing in France in 1944.

Backed by the legendary Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, the 88-acre memorial site has sculptural tributes to all service branches, a Victory Plaza and a massive arch ringed by the flags of the Allied Expeditionary Forces. The City of Bedford was picked by Congress as the site of the nation's memorial to the D-Day forces partly because the city, which had a population of 3,200 in 1944, had the highest per capita losses of any other American community during the Normandy landings.

Visitors to the D-Day Memorial will also find a lot more American history in the area. Poplar Forest, the mountain retreat home designed and built by Thomas Jefferson, can be visited along with the Booker T. Washington National Monument near the 19th-century birthplace of the founder of Tuskegee Institute.

Neighboring Lynchburg is the site of patriot Patrick Henry's home, Red Hill, and of the Federal-era mansion of his friend and physician, George Cabell. Nearby is the Appomattox Courthouse National Historical Park, where Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant, ending the Civil War.

Summerfest livemusic eventslated June 28

Summer's ultimate live music experience may be in Milwaukee. Summerfest, declared by the Guinness Book of World Records to be the globe's biggest music festival, will fill 13 stages June 28 through July 8 at the 90-acre Henry W. Maier Festival Park on the shores of Lake Michigan. Nearly a million people from around the world attended last year. Shows will be offered from 11:30 a.m. to midnight. Music will range from glam rock to Latin, rhythm and blues to country, heavy metal to nostalgia, reggae to zydeco. Top performers on the schedule include rocker Bon Jovi, country star Tim McGraw, R & amp;B's Destiny's Child and pop-punk Blink-182. For a complete schedule, visit www.summerfest.com. Concerts are ticketed individually. Festival admission of $8 covers family activities, demonstrations and access to food booths. For further facts on the 33-year-old event, call 1-800-273-3378.

Airline miles earned through products

Dallas resident Lynne Noakes, has earned nearly 200,000 American Airlines frequent-flier miles through a promotion sponsored by Kellogg USA. Noakes buys specially labeled products by the shopping cart-load, and donates most of the food to the North Texas Food Bank in memory of her late father. As for the miles, she uses them to travel to singing competitions, with the Rich-Tone Chorus of Sweet Adelines International, and for upgrades.

"I typically store 200-300 packages in my formal dining room until the food bank picks it up," Noakes says.

Kellogg officials say it has given away more than 300 million miles. It estimates that consumers spend $1 for every 25 miles they earn. That means the promotion only makes monetary sense if you're already buying Kellogg products, because it will cost you $1,000 to earn a free domestic ticket.

For miles to be credited, the 100-mile award certificates printed on the back of participating Kellogg's brands must be redeemed in groups of five. For questions, visit www.kelloggs.com and select AAdvantage miles under Special Offers or call 1-800-962-1413.




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