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KEYSTONE CLIPS Technology trips up vote



Published: Sun, May 27, 2001 @ 12:00 a.m.



The marvels of modern science don't always solve the problem -- particularly when it comes to communication at a school board meeting.

School Director Donald Golub of Sharon was unable to attend a Sharon City School Board meeting in person last week but made arrangements to be present by telephone.

Things were going pretty well until it became apparent that Golub couldn't hear his name being called when it came time for a roll call vote on the hiring of an assistant girls basketball coach.

It was his turn to vote first but he didn't respond when his name was called by a secretary sitting about 20 feet from the speaker phone. The Rev. Lora Adams-King, board president, who was sitting next to the phone, called out, "Mr. Golub?"

"Yes," came the response from the telephone, but that left another question in the Rev. Mrs. Adams-King's mind. "Is that a vote?" she asked. "Yes," came the reply again.

Radon information: You can't see it, smell it or taste it, but radon gas, believed to be the second leading cause of lung cancer, could be in your home, said state Rep. Rod Wilt of Greenville, R-17th.

The Radon Division of the state Department of Environmental Protection has a Radon Hotline to provide Pennsylvania homeowners with general information on the gas and in-home testing. They can call (800) 23-RADON.

The most common test for radon is a do-it-yourself charcoal canister kit available at most hardware and home improvement stores, Wilt said.

The gas is produced from the natural decay of uranium deposits found in nearly all soils. It moves up through the ground and into buildings through construction joints, well water or foundation cracks.

Family farm preserved: The Musser family can be assured their 99-acre Lawrence County family farm won't give way to massive housing plans.

The North Beaver Township property was recently approved for easement purchase by the State Agricultural Land Preservation Board, said state Rep. Chris Sainato of New Castle, D-9th. The farm is the eighth farm preserved in county, the first in North Beaver, he said. The program started in 1988 to help preserve open space in the state.

XCONTRIBUTORS: Harold Gwin, Vindicator Sharon Bureau, and Laure Cioffi, New Castle Bureau.




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